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Cat Care

IT’S YOUR PET’S BIRTHDAY!

April 8th, 2021 by Cherished Companions

Here’s some fun ways to celebrate your four-legged friend’s special day

We know that our clients think of their animal companions as family members—and that means celebrating milestones like birthdays! If you don’t know the exact date your furry friend was born, many families celebrate their pet’s adoption day as their birthday. Either way, we know your pet won’t mind as long as they’re doing something fun with YOU.

Why celebrate your pet’s birthday?

Well, our Castle Rock veterinarians believe in promoting the human-animal bond, and anytime you have the opportunity to include your pet in an activity that you both enjoy, you’ll strengthen that bond.

Family pets who spend a lot of quality time with their people tend to be more responsive and better-behaved companions as well.

So what fun things are there to do with my dog in the Castle Rock area?

Colorado pets are blessed with lots of beautiful outdoor places to play. Our Castle Rock veterinarians have mixed feelings about dog parks, but as long as your pet is current on vaccinations, is well socialized, and you keep your eye on your canine friend, they can be a great experience for you and your pet.

Some of our favorite Castle Rock area dog parks and open spaces include:

Hiking

Of course hiking with dogs in Colorado is an amazing way to observe their special day. Before you head out, however, you’ll want to make sure your dog is up to date on vaccinations and parasite prevention and that you’re aware of hiking hazards

Some of the best dog-friendly hikes in our area of Colorado are:

Dog-Friendly Urban Adventures

Looking for a city setting for your pet’s birthday bash? Now that some businesses are starting to open up post-pandemic, here are some spots where you can shop, dine, and drink with your fido:

Road Trippin’

We know many dogs don’t care where you go as long as there’s a car or truck ride involved—so how about a mini road trip into the country? While we don’t advocate high-speed, windows-down rides on the freeway, a slow meander on a country road to see–and smell–the scenery is great stimulation for dogs. A few fun drives with your dog include:

  • Hwy 67 along the South Platte River to Deckers
  • Hwy 300/Rampart Range Road
  • Hwy 105 to Palmer Lake (where your pet can take a refreshing dip and you can get a delicious scoop at Rock House Ice Cream!)

My pet is older and something of a couch potato. Are there less active things we can do to mark my pet’s birthday? 

Our Castle Rock veterinarians love senior pets and if you have one, that is definitely something to celebrate! And while we’re on the subject of seniors, one of the most loving gifts you can give your elder pet is twice-yearly wellness exams. Because pets age faster than we do, disease and illness progress faster as well, and you want to catch health issues early before they become bigger problems.

While many older pets enjoy parks, hikes, and active play, some are more content to chill in their favorite spots at home. But there are more “sedate” things you can do to make them feel special.

Related article

The best birthday present you can give your pet is regular, preventive health care from your Cherished Companions veterinarian!

Annual exams, vaccinations, parasite protection, and more – call 303-688-3757 or

Book your visit here 

Cherished Companions Animal Clinic specializes in the care of cats and dogs. Our goal is to help your pet have as many happy, healthy years with you as possible—and to make your experience at our clinic comfortable and as stress-free as possible.

This article is intended to provide general guidance on issues that may cause a cat to have a poor coat. If you live in or around the Castle Rock area and have specific questions or concerns, please don’t hesitate to contact us at 303-688-3757.

© 2021, Cherished Companions Animal Clinic, All Rights Reserved00


Diagnosing Pets: Which Is Better, X-Ray or Ultrasound?

February 9th, 2021 by Cherished Companions

Diagnosing your pet’s condition may require the use of one of these tools—or both

Over the years, our Castle Rock veterinarians have diagnosed thousands of dogs and cats. As veterinary care has advanced, so has the technology used to help animal doctors get a faster and better picture of how to help your pet.

Two of the best tools for diagnosing sick and injured pets and people are X-ray (also known as “radiographs”) and ultrasound. Our Castle Rock veterinarians break down the difference between the two this way:

  • X-rays use electromagnetic radiation to showcase imaging of the pet’s body structure and highlight objects within.
  • Ultrasound uses sound waves to produce images of your pet’s interior systems. The sound waves bounce back and forth to create the imagery.

Ultrasound and X-ray are valuable options for diagnosing illness and injury in both dogs and cats.

What pet health issues can be best seen and diagnosed with ultrasound? 

“Soft tissue” issues in pets, such as those involving the gastrointestinal, heart, and nervous systems, are usually identified with ultrasound, as it essentially shows the vet three-dimensional images of these areas. However, ultrasound doesn’t work well when it comes to respiratory problems in the chest and thorax because the air blocks the soundwaves.

Aside from fractures, what types of conditions can be best seen and diagnosed with X-rays?

X-ray is indeed used frequently for fractures in pets, but it can also reveal lung abnormalities,

congestive heart failure, and foreign bodies in the GI tract—if those foreign bodies are made of hard plastic or metal. That plastic chew toy or spare change your fur friend gobbled up will block radiation, so it will show up clearly on an X-ray.

What would be the reasons for choosing one tool over another? Are there times when both are necessary for a diagnosis? 

There are several things that determine which diagnostic tool the vet will use for your pet. Your pet’s symptoms, health, and behavior as well as our veterinarian’s initial observations are all factors.  

For health issues that aren’t easily visible injuries, your Castle Rock veterinarian would look for signs pointing to your pet having a foreign body issue, an enlarged heart, heart disease or another problem.

In many cases, there is good reason to use both X-ray and ultrasound to diagnose or to narrow down your pet’s health issue. For example, if it appears to the vet that the pet ingested a foreign object, then an X-ray would likely be done first. But should that veterinary X-ray show an enlarged spleen, then an ultrasound would be used to get a better image of the spleen since it is soft tissue.

Does my pet need to be sedated for ultrasounds and X-rays?

Usually not. Most animals will relax once they are put in the position and realize that that the vet tech and doctor are there to help and not to hurt. We’re experts at making your pet feel comfortable!

That said, there are some exceptions. Very young and active animals or those who are unusually nervous may need a sedative to stay calm. It really just depends on the personality of the pet. Another occasion when sedation might be necessary is when doing hip X-rays, which can be more difficult for pets.

Keep in mind that at Cherished Companions, we have a Comfort First Pledge, so you can rest easy knowing we’ll do everything we can to see that your pet stays as pain- and anxiety-free as possible while in our care.

We’ll also make sure that you’re comfortable, too: our warm, friendly staff is here to answer any questions you may have about your pet’s health and to make getting veterinary services at Cherished Companions a relaxed experience. We even have a play area to keep your kids occupied while you wait!

What does it mean when you say our Castle Rock veterinarian uses “digital” ultrasound and radiography for your pet’s diagnosis?

Back in the day, veterinary X-ray films had to be developed like regular photography film. Today most medical imaging is digital and computerized. The benefits of digital X-rays and ultrasounds include:

  • Faster viewing. Basically, the X-ray or ultrasound machine is hooked up to a computer so it can be viewed within seconds. This makes for a quicker diagnosis for your pet, which means treatment can start that much sooner.  
  • Less stress. In the past if an image wasn’t clear or was inconclusive, there would be long waits or even rescheduling for retakes. With digital, retakes can be done on the same day making it easier on pets, families, and the veterinary staff.
  • Easy sharing. When doctors need a specialist to take a look, digital images can simply be emailed.

There are also environmental benefits, given that no physical materials or chemicals are necessary to see and develop the images!

Do veterinarians and veterinary technicians need special training to read ultrasounds and X-rays?

Veterinary technicians don’t usually read X-rays or ultrasounds, and instead are there to assist the doctor by positioning and calming the pet.

Reading veterinary X-rays does require some training, but it’s something that most veterinarians should be comfortable doing. To read ultrasounds, however, doctors do need some special additional education. At Cherished Companions, our Castle Rock veterinarian is a graduate of a two-year veterinary ultrasound certification course, so you know your pet is getting the best medical expertise available!

Related article

Help your cat feel better

If your cat is in pain while eating and you live near Castle Rock, Colorado, reach out to our cat veterinarians at 303-688-3757 or:

Book your visit here 

Cherished Companions Animal Clinic specializes in the care of cats and dogs. Our goal is to help your pet have as many happy, healthy years with you as possible—and to make your experience at our clinic comfortable and as stress-free as possible.

This article is intended to provide general guidance on issues that may cause a cat to have a poor coat. If you live in or around the Castle Rock area and have specific questions or concerns, please don’t hesitate to contact us at 303-688-3757.

© 2021, Cherished Companions Animal Clinic, All Rights Reserved


“My cat sometimes hides. Should I be worried?”

October 27th, 2020 by Cherished Companions

Hiding is fairly normal, but it can also be a sign your cat’s not doing well

Dr. Melanie is the owner of Cherished Companions and has been a practicing veterinarian for over 25 years. She’s had many beloved dogs and cats in her family, including a feline named “Hidey” who got that name because she found great places to hide from predators when she was outside. Hidey lived to be 21 years old, which attests to her ability to avoid danger (and having a vet mom probably helped, too!)

Dr. Melanie says that cats instinctually hide illness and injury, so that makes it even more important to pay attention to their behavior, especially when it changes. Hiding is a behavior that can occur for many reasons, including:

  • Illness/injury. It could be any health issue—dental disease, cancer, gastrointestinal problems, heart or kidney disease, or the cat is physically hurt. Cats should always be checked if they suddenly start hiding and the environment has not changed.
  • If the cat is in a new place. This is normal, just give your cat a few days to acclimate. A sense of fear is normal when the cat’s surroundings change.
  • New people/animals in the house. Again, this is a normal reaction, and the cat may need time to adjust.

When should I be concerned?

When the cat is hiding 24/7 and not coming out to eat, drink or use the litterbox, that means there may be an underlying health condition. At that point, it is important to have your cat checked out by a Cherished Companions veterinarian.

Cats are nocturnal by nature, so if your cat hides during the day and comes out at night to eat and use the litterbox, you don’t need to be as concerned right away.

Is hiding instinctual for cats? Do social or “extroverted” cats also hide at times?

Even extroverted cats like Maine Coons will occasionally hide, especially if in a new place or stressful situation. Again, the main thing to watch for is when they don’t follow their routine and come out to eat or use the litterbox.

In general, there is no breed or type of cat more prone to hiding—but what does matter is how the cat was treated in the past, especially when they were young. For example, if they were feral and eventually tamed, you will find that previously feral cats will hide more than others. If your cat was not socialized with other cats or people when they were kittens, they may also hide more frequently.

How do cats choose where they hide? Should I create safe place for my cat to do this?

Cats tend to choose places where:

  • they feel safest, or felt safest in the past
  • they’re enclosed on all sides
  • they can be in corners, enclosed on three sides looking out
  • there are familiar smells (litterboxes, piles of your clothes, warm fresh laundry)

It’s not necessary to create a “safe space”—your cat will find one. However, you can enhance the space of their choice: for instance, if your cat likes a corner in the closet or a perch up on a shelf, put a soft blanket in the spot for them.

What you should not do, however, is put food or water in your cat’s hiding place—you don’t want to create a habit and encourage the cat to stay hidden more than they already are.

Should I try to get my cat out when she/he hides?

Maybe not initially. If they remain hiding for a half day or a full day, then it’s time to check on your pet and try and lure them out. If your cat does come out, but then immediately retreats to their hiding spot, this should raise concern and a visit to the vet is a good idea.

Are there other behaviors that are common with cats when they hide, such as aggression or licking?

Not always. If you do see these behaviors, take note to what may have caused them. For example, if your cat is suddenly acting aggressive, did they perhaps just have an encounter with a new animal?

If you cannot tell why they are acting different, this is another sign that a visit to your Cherished Companions veterinarian is in order—and don’t forget to tell the doctor about this unusual behavior.

As for constant licking of a certain part of the body, this is a sign in both cats and dogs that they have pain in this location, and another reason to visit the vet.

The bottom line with cats that hide is to pay attention to your pet! Don’t hesitate to reach out to us and ask if you have the slightest concern about your feline friend. It’s much better to have the vet tell you there’s nothing wrong than to find out you could have prevented a health problem if it had been detected earlier.

Related article

Help your cat feel better

If your cat is in pain while eating and you live near Castle Rock, Colorado, reach out to our cat veterinarians at 303-688-3757 or:

Book your visit here 

Cherished Companions Animal Clinic specializes in the care of cats and dogs. Our goal is to help your pet have as many happy, healthy years with you as possible—and to make your experience at our clinic comfortable and as stress-free as possible.

This article is intended to provide general guidance on issues that may cause a cat to have a poor coat. If you live in or around the Castle Rock area and have specific questions or concerns, please don’t hesitate to contact us at 303-688-3757.

© 2020, Cherished Companions Animal Clinic, All Rights Reserved


“My cat’s fur is dull, greasy, thin, clumping, falling out…why?”

August 17th, 2020 by Cherished Companions

This issue could have many causes: medical, environmental, or even psychological.

Dr. Ivy at Cherished Companions has a special bond with cats—she’s had 10 of them, including her current companion, a Maine Coon mix named Murphy. She says there are several hair/coat-related symptoms you might see in a cat having health issues:

  • Flaky
  • Dandruff along the body
  • Red skin / rashes / scabs / inflamed skin and wound-like areas (cat is scratching a lot)
  • If the cat is losing hair, is the cat losing it in clumps or is it general thinning? Shedding can be normal especially in the spring and summer time.
  • Pay attention if your cat is not grooming as frequently; this can mean they are not feeling well.

Cats can be elusive and it’s often difficult to know when they’re having a problem. One way to stay on top of your pet’s health is to brush your cat regularly so you can familiarize yourself with your companion’s hair and skin. That way, you’ll know when something is “off” or abnormal.

What are the most common health issues you see that cause hair and coat problems in cats?

Parasites and allergies are really the #1 cause. While Colorado is lucky in that our climate is dry and fleas aren’t as severe here, they do exist. Along with mites and lice, these parasites can give your cat an allergic reaction that results in hair loss, itchiness around the head and neck, and inflamed skin. Bacterial and fungal infections are also frequent in cats with allergies.

The second most common issue involving poor skin and coat is when a cat has dry, flaky, or oily skin. Usually a feline with these problems isn’t grooming itself because it is not feeling well. The cause could be an internal systemic illness, such as:

  • kidney disease
  • thyroid issues
  • liver disease
  • autoimmune problems
  • cancer

Cats will often also lick an area that is in pain, causing hair loss or a skin lesion. They may lick at a sore joint, or even their belly as a sign of a bladder infection.

 

What are the psychological issues that could cause a cat to have hair and skin problems?

Licking and hair loss may be due to stress—has there been a change in the home, such as relocation or the addition of a new pet? Cats can be extremely sensitive to alterations in their surroundings.

These symptoms can also be a sign of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Many times, OCD is diagnosed through a process of elimination. If nothing else is going on that could cause your pet to be stressed, OCD may be the culprit.

 

What are the treatments for making my cat more comfortable and resolving my cat’s skin and coat problems?

Obviously, treating the underlying condition and making your cat more comfortable are a priority for us and for you. Depending on the cause of the issue, treatments can include:

  • Bathing with medicated shampoos and/or conditioners
  • Eliminating parasites on the pet and in the home
  • Using anti-inflammatory or antimicrobial medications to resolve bacterial and yeast infections
  • E-collars and cones to prevent licking and speed recovery
  • Starting a hypoallergenic diet or medications for allergies

Please talk to your CCAC veterinarian before you use any product on your cat—some cleansing products have ingredients that may be toxic to your pet.

 

Good nutrition is your cat’s first line of defense against skin and coat issues!

A well-balanced diet is the first line of defense for your pet when it comes to overall health as well as coat and skin problems.

Dr. Ivy and all the vets at Cherished Companions Animal Clinic believe that one of the most important nutrients for your cat’s skin is omega-3 fatty acids. They are the building blocks for healthy skin and hair, and you can easily add an omega-3 supplement to your cat’s diet.

The good news is that, regardless of the reason behind the untidy appearance of your cat’s coat, there are solutions that we can work through together so that you can get back to doing what you really want to do: snuggling with your furry friend.

Related article

Help your cat feel better

If your cat is in pain while eating and you live near Castle Rock, Colorado, reach out to our cat veterinarians at 303-688-3757 or:

Book your visit here 

Cherished Companions Animal Clinic specializes in the care of cats and dogs. Our goal is to help your pet have as many happy, healthy years with you as possible—and to make your experience at our clinic comfortable and as stress-free as possible.

This article is intended to provide general guidance on issues that may cause a cat to have a poor coat. If you live in or around the Castle Rock area and have specific questions or concerns, please don’t hesitate to contact us at 303-688-3757.

© 2020, Cherished Companions Animal Clinic, All Rights Reserved


“My Cat Is in Pain When He Eats”

March 26th, 2020 by Cherished Companions

Two cats eating - one cat is in pain while he eats

Resorptive lesions may be to blame. Here’s what you need to know…

Lately, you’ve noticed that your cat is in pain when he (or she) eats. Maybe:

  • Your cat is eating more slowly.
  • Your cat is taking small bites and dropping the kibble.
  • You’ve noticed big changes in your cat’s eating habits. For example, your normally-picky eater is now gulping food. Or your normally-fast eater is not eating his food.
  • Your cat is drooling, pawing and rubbing at his face, and has bad breath, or…
  • You can hear a clicking or crunching noise when your cat eats.

There are different reasons for changes in your cat’s eating habits, but if your cat appears to be in pain, a common culprit is a “resorptive lesion.”

What are resorptive lesions in cats?

In layman’s terms, a resorptive lesion is like a cavity in human teeth.

It’s a defect in the enamel and tissue of the tooth.

The tooth enamel starts to dissolve. It opens up and exposes the inside of your cat’s tooth (where the nerves and blood supply are).

Ouch!

Resorptive lesions can lead to other issues in your cat’s mouth, like infections.

Cinnamon, the cat, rests on her owner's arms after eating.

Are resorptive lesions painful?

Yes, they expose the pulp cavity of your cat’s teeth.

What causes resorptive lesions in cats?

There are several theories on what causes resorptive lesions, but there’s no known cause yet.

Even cats with fairly clean mouths can get resorptive lesions, so this is one way these lesions are different than human cavities.

Some cats will get a resorptive lesion in one tooth and never have an issue again.

Other cats will get multiple resorptive lesions over their lifetimes.

Every cat is different.

Resorptive lesions tend to be more common in middle-aged to older cats, but our cat veterinarians have seen them in younger cats too.

Resorptive lesions are much more common in cats than dogs.

What is the treatment?

Any time your cat has a resorptive lesion, that tooth needs to be fully removed.

There is no treatment to save that tooth.

If your cat has multiple resorptive lesions, you may want to plan on more frequent dental cleanings. This way, we can catch the lesions before they become problematic and painful for your cat.

Related article

Help your cat feel better

If your cat is in pain while eating and you live near Castle Rock, Colorado, reach out to our cat veterinarians at 303-688-3757 or:

Book your visit here 

Cherished Companions Animal Clinic is a veterinary clinic in Castle Rock, Colorado. Specializing in the care of cats and dogs, our goal is to help you and your pet feel more comfortable, keeping your stress to a minimum.

This article is intended to provide general guidance on resorptive lesions — a possible reason your cat may be in pain while eating. If you have specific questions or concerns, please contact your local veterinarian. (If you live in or around Castle Rock, we welcome your call: 303-688-3757.)

© 2020, Cherished Companions Animal Clinic, All Rights Reserved


“My Cat Isn’t Eating as Much as Usual. What’s Going on?”

January 30th, 2020 by Cherished Companions

An orange cat feels lethargic because he hasn't been eating as much as usual.

Our cats march to the beat of their own drums (and we love them for it), but you’re smart to be on high alert if you notice: “My cat isn’t eating as much as usual.”

In this article, you’ll find:

  1. Common reasons your cat may not be eating all his or her food
  2. What you can do at home
  3. When to be concerned

Let’s jump into possible reasons your cat is eating less than usual…

Your cat may be finding other food sources

Yep, your cat may be getting meals elsewhere.

It’s worth investigating:

  • Has your cat gotten into a spare bag of cat food — or dog food — without you knowing it?
  • If your cat spends time outside, could your cat be catching mice or having a neighbor feed your cat? (Plenty of people put food out for stray cats.)
  • Do you have a guest staying in your home or a child home from college who may be feeding your cat in-between normal mealtimes without you knowing it?

Miss Maisie, the cat, rubs on her person's legs in the kitchen. She hasn't been eating as much as usual.

Stress-related issues

Some cats eat less (or stop eating) when they get stressed.

If your cat is stressed, you also may notice your cat is hiding more and/or you may see blood in your cat’s urine.

While it can be hard to predict what’s causing the stress, cats can get stressed from things like:

  • A move to a new home
  • A renovation project in your home
  • A house guest who is staying with you
  • A new cat in the neighborhood that’s prowling
  • A new pet in the house
  • Your travel plans

Has anything been going on that could be stressing your cat?

Mouth-related issues

There are a number of things that could be going on in your cat’s mouth:

  • Dental disease (aka, “periodontal disease”). Most adult cats have some stage of dental disease. One of the things you may notice is your cat is still eating… but your cat’s eating habits have changed. For example, your cat doesn’t want to eat wet food anymore (or vice versa with dry food). Some cats will start swallowing their food whole. They stop trying to bite into it.
  • A resorptive lesion. This means there’s a defect in the enamel of one of your cat’s teeth. (It’s similar to having a cavity.) It can be painful for your cat.
  • Trauma to your cat’s mouth or head, such as loose teeth or an injury from a cat fight.
  • Other painful conditions in your cat’s mouth. Not too long ago, our cat veterinarians saw a kitten that had chewed an electrical cord. The kitten got shocked and had sores in its mouth. (Poor lil’ thing!)
  • Cancer of the mouth. This is more common in older cats than younger cats. (Your cat may be drooling and have bad breath too.)

Systematic issues (mainly in older cats)

If your cat isn’t eating as much as he used to, there also could be issues going on in other parts of your cat’s body. Your cat may have:

  • Cat kidney disease (known as “cat renal disease”). As this disease progresses, cats get pickier and don’t want to eat as much as they used to.
  • Liver disease. Your cat may feel nauseous and not want to eat.
  • Gastro Similar to liver disease, your cat may feel nauseous and not want to eat — or be picky with eating.

Of these cat diseases, kidney disease is the most common.

“What should I do if my cat isn’t eating as much as usual?”

If you ever have questions about your cat, we always recommend reaching out to a veterinarian, but…

Let’s say you aren’t ready to contact a veterinarian yet.

Maybe you have multiple pets in your home, and you aren’t exactly sure who’s eating what!

It’s time to put on your detective hat.

You may want to confine your cat to one room (like a bathroom or a small bedroom) for 24 to 48 hours.

Make your cat comfortable with food, water, a litter box and comfortable bedding.

This way, you can observe what’s happening with your cat’s eating habits.

You also can monitor if your cat is having any urinary issues or diarrhea issues.

Joel snuggles with his cat while trying to figure out why she hasn't been eating.

Another option…

You can try to look in your cat’s mouth.

(We know some cats are more on board with this than others!)

You may be able to notice symptoms like:

  • Red gums
  • Bleeding gums
  • A bad smell in your cat’s mouth
  • A lot of tartar build-up, or
  • Loose teeth

These symptoms usually suggest a mouth-related issue.

If your cat isn’t eating and is hiding…

Or, you notice other behavior changes…

That’s usually a sign that your cat is sick and not feeling well.

When to be concerned

If cat doesn’t eat one meal and then returns to normal eating habits, this usually isn’t a concern.

But if your cat is not eating for days, it’s important to reach out to a veterinarian.

Dogs can go much longer than cats without eating. When cats stop eating, they start introducing the risk of different diseases.

Soon, you may find yourself needing to address multiple issues, rather than just the original reason your cat wasn’t eating!

Not to mention, your cat is likely is not feeling well and may be in some discomfort.

Help your cat feel better

If your cat isn’t eating as much as usual and you live near Castle Rock, Colorado, we welcome your call. Reach out to our cat veterinarians at 303-688-3757 or:

Book your visit here 

Cherished Companions Animal Clinic is a veterinary clinic in Castle Rock, Colorado. Specializing in the care of cats and dogs, our goal is to help you and your pet feel more comfortable, keeping your stress to a minimum.

This article is intended to provide general guidance on why your cat may not be eating as much as usual. If you have specific questions or concerns, please contact your local veterinarian. (If you live in or around Castle Rock, Colorado, we welcome your call: 303-688-3757.)

© 2020, Cherished Companions Animal Clinic, All Rights Reserved


What to Do If Your Cat Is Peeing Blood & How Fast to Act

September 24th, 2019 by Cherished Companions

A beautiful cat sits next to a red litter box. This cat has been peeing blood lately.

What to Do If Your Cat Is Peeing Blood

It can make your heart race a little faster when you discover your cat is peeing blood. (We totally get it!)

(more…)


Blood in Your Cat’s Urine | 4 Possible Causes

August 13th, 2019 by Cherished Companions

Sophie, the cat, sits in a litter box. She's been leaving blood in her urine in the litter box.

You’ve noticed your cat is leaving blood spots around the house…

Or perhaps, you’ve seeing blood in your cat’s urine in the litter box.

We know this can be unsettling! (more…)


Have a Diabetic Cat? Tips for Feeding, Insulin Shots, and Glucose Checks

April 16th, 2019 by Cherished Companions Animal Clinic

Bandit, a diabetic cat, happily rolls on the ground. He has been able to lead a normal life since getting on a consistent feeding, insulin and glucose check schedule.

If you recently learned your cat has diabetes, take heart…

A diabetic cat can have a fairly normal life, particularly if:

  • Your cat regulates glucose well and
  • You’re committed to your kitty’s care

And yes, your cat may be able to live a fairly normal life expectancy!

(more…)


How to Keep Your Cat Safe Outdoors

October 28th, 2018 by Cherished Companions Animal Clinic

This family let their cat outside to play with their daughter.

“The backyard is calling, and I must go.” – Cat mantra

The best way to keep your cat safe… is to keep your cat indoors.

But that’s not always possible or desired. (We get it!)

Here are 10 tips from our veterinarians on how to keep your cat safe outdoors.

(more…)


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